Cumberland Pediatrics - Providing outstanding child and adolescent care in Lebanon, TN

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Phone: 615-453-1252
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1029 W Main St • Suite M
Lebanon, TN 37087-3282

For the very best in your child’s healthcare

Welcome to Cumberland Pediatrics Online!

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Three locations providing outstanding care:

 

In Lebanon
Cumberland Pediatric Associates
1029 West Main St. Suite M
Lebanon, TN 37087
Hours:
Monday–Friday, 8AM to 5PM
(By Appointment)

In Gordonsville
Cumberland Pediatric Associates
8 New Middleton Hwy.
Gordonsville, TN 38563
Hours:
Monday–Friday, 8AM to 5PM
(By Appointment)

Kids Care Walk-In/Urgent Care Clinic
1029 West Main St. Suite O
Lebanon, TN 37087
Hours:
Monday–Friday, 8AM to 7PM
Saturday & Sunday, 8AM to 2PM
Call 615-453-1252 to make an appointment at our Lebanon Office or for information about Kids Care Walk-In/Urgent Care Clinic.

Call 615-683-4200 to make an appointment at our Gordonsville Office!


Cumberland Pediatric Associates and Kids Care Walk-In/Urgent Care Clinic are committed to providing outstanding child and adolescent care. Our practice specializes in preventive care, and acute care of children from birth to age 18. Our dedicated pediatricians provide skillful, professional, friendly, medical care to help your children grow strong year after year. 

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We are on call for emergencies 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

• Member of the American Academy of Pediatrics 
• Committed to Continuing Education
• Voted “Best Pediatricians Office” in Wilson County seven years in a row

 
best of wilson county

615-453-1252

Stay up-to-date with our Doctors' Blog!


Read the newest blog below:
05/15/2014
Dr. Tabitha Casilli
(Update Courtesy of the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC - www.cdc.gov )

2014-05-15-1
Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus. Measles starts with a fever. Soon after, it causes a cough, runny nose, and red eyes. Then a rash of tiny, red spots breaks out. It starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body. Measles can be serious for young children. It can lead to pneumonia, encephalitis (swelling of the brain), and death.

How Measles Spreads
Measles spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It is so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people around him or her will also become infected if they are not protected.

People in the United States still get measles, but it's not very common. That's because most people in this country are protected against measles through vaccination. However, since measles is still common in parts of Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa, measles is brought into the United States by people who get infected while they are abroad.

Your child's doctor may offer the MMRV vaccine, a combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox).

Protect Your Child at Home and when Traveling with Measles Vaccine
You can protect your child against measles with a combination vaccine that provides protection against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). The MMR vaccine is proven to be very safe and effective.

Protect Yourself Against Measles
Some adults need measles vaccine too. For more information, see Measles Vaccination: Who Needs It?

Paying for Measles Vaccine
Most health insurance plans cover the cost of vaccines. But you may want to check with your health insurance provider before going to the doctor. Learn how to pay for vaccines.

If you don't have insurance or if your insurance does not cover vaccines for your child, the Vaccines for Children Program may be able to help. This program helps families of eligible children who might not otherwise have access to vaccines. To find out if your child is eligible, visit the VFC website or ask your child's doctor. You can also contact your state VFC coordinator.

Cause
Measles is a respiratory disease caused by a virus. The disease of measles and the virus that causes it share the same name. The disease is also called rubeola. Measles virus normally grows in the cells that line the back of the throat and lungs.

Symptoms
Measles causes fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. Visit the Signs and Symptoms page for more information, and the Photos of Measles page to see pictures of people with the measles rash.

Complications
About one out of 10 children with measles also gets an ear infection, and up to one out of 20 gets pneumonia. About one out of 1,000 gets encephalitis, and one or two out of 1,000 die. Other rash-causing diseases often confused with measles include roseola (roseola infantum) and rubella (German measles).
While measles is almost gone from the United States, it still kills an estimated 164,000 people each year around the world. Measles can also make a pregnant woman have a miscarriage or give birth prematurely. For more information, visit the Complications page.

Transmission
Measles spreads through the air by breathing, coughing or sneezing. It is so contagious that any child who is exposed to it and is not immune will probably get the disease. See the Transmission page for more information.

Measles Incidence
Measles is very rare in countries and regions of the world that are able to keep vaccination coverage high. In North and South America, Finland, and some other areas, endemic measles transmission is considered to have been interrupted through vaccination. There are still sporadic cases of measles in the United States because visitors from other countries or US citizens traveling abroad can become infected before or during travel and spread the infection to unvaccinated or unprotected persons.
Worldwide, there are estimated to be 20 million cases and 164,000 deaths each year. More than half of the deaths occur in India. For more information on measles in the United States and worldwide, visit the Global Elimination page.

Measles History
One of the earliest written descriptions of measles as a disease was provided by an Arab physician in the 9th century who described differences between measles and smallpox in his medical notes.
A Scottish physician, Francis Home, demonstrated in 1757 that measles was caused by an infectious agent present in the blood of patients. In 1954 the virus that causes measles was isolated in Boston, Massachusetts, by John F. Enders and Thomas C. Peebles. Before measles vaccine, nearly all children got measles by the time they were 15 years of age. Each year in the United States about 450-500 people died because of measles, 48,000 were hospitalized, 7,000 had seizures, and about 1,000 suffered permanent brain damage or deafness. Today there are only about 60 cases a year reported in the United States, and most of these originate outside the country.

More information:
http://www.cdc.gov/measles/about/index.html

Measles Vaccination:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/measles/

Learn more about MMRV vaccine.
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/combo-vaccines/mmrv/vacopt.htm

Learn more about MMR vaccine.
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/measles/